‘Honkytonk Badonkadonk’: Country Music’s Trace Adkins Channels ‘Hick-Hop’

Blindie recently got an earful of country music singer (and Celebrity Apprentice finalist) Trace Adkins’ song “Honkytonk Badonkadonk“–and an eyeful of his bumpkin booty video.

And we have to ask, at what point did country turn into rap?

Adkins borrows heavily from Missy Elliot’s “Work It” (in which she refers to her backside as a “gadonka donk donk”), will.i.am’s “I Got It Fom My Mama,” and Ludacris and Pharell’s “Money Maker.”

Sharing his love of badonkadonk and praising country gals for their well-endowed bums, Adkins proclaims in his song:

Lord have mercy, how’s she even get them britches on that honky tonk badonkadonk. Now Honey, you can’t blame her for what her mama gave her. It ain’t right to hate her for workin’ that money-maker.

The video is filled with hip-swinging, rump-shaking girls and Adkins even sports a huge four-finger ring that spells the song’s title.

Of course the blending of the two genres is nothing new, as evident in artists like Cowboy Troy, Nappy Roots and Kid Rock. Johnny Cash can even be touted as the original country rapper as he half-talked, half-sung his way through badass songs that boasted killing a man in Reno and shooting his woman.

Since this latest genre-hopping, dubbed “hick-hop,” must exist, Blindie was hoping it would produce more hits like Nelly and Tim Mcgraw’s 2004 duet, “Over and Over”–not more booty-loving anthems.

Ga Ga: Miko Marks, The Next Big Country Singer

Following in the footsteps of Charley Pride–the first African American to achieve considerable success in the white-dominated country music industry–Miko Marks declares, “I’m going to be a big country singer.”

Hailing from Flint, Mich., the stunning country crooner has already recorded two CDs in Nashville with producer Ron Cornelius–a former guitarist for Bob Dylan–and has taken her act on the road playing at malls, nightclubs, and rodeos. She recently kicked off the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo at Rowell Ranch in Calif, where she sang the national anthem.

Miko belts out heartfelt songs with a soulful twang reminiscent of country superstars Reba McEntire and Wynonna Judd. She received considerable airplay on independent radio stations with her single “Mama” off her debut album Freeway Bound (2005).

The video even featured a cameo appearance by neo-soul artist Erykah Badu. But promoting her second album, It Feels Good, recorded on the small Mirrome label, is proving to be a challenge as she realizes there is little attention paid to independent artists on corporate radio stations.

“The major labels just suck up the airtime, so there’s very little to nothing left for the independent artists,” says Miko. “I’m gonna stick with it. I’m not gonna put this down.” Pointing out the embossed butterflies on her guitar, she adds, “These are butterflies, I’m gonna soar just as high as they do.”

We were ga ga for Miko as soon as we heard her belt out, “There’s an unfamiliar freedom callin’ out my name,” on her track “It Feels Good.” We’re even considering getting a 10-gallon hat and joining her fan club!