South African Runner Semenya Shows off Girly Make-Over for Cover of You Magazine

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Maybe it was to silence the critics who claim she’s really a man, or maybe she just wanted to feel glamorous in make-up and pretty clothes like most woman. Whatever the case, South African runner Caster Semenya cleaned up and dolled up for a fashion shoot in the September issue of South African magazine YOU.

Last month’s world track championhsips thrust 18 year-old Semenya into the spotlight as her gender was brought into question. One of her coaches, Wilfried Daniels, has since resigned amidst the controversy claiming he was ashamed of being “part of the collective responsibility and blame” for having Semenya unknowingly gender tested and the resulting public scandal for what should have been a private medical issue.

Semenya says in the magazine, “I’d like to dress up more often and wear dresses but I never get the chance. I’d also like to learn to do my own make-up” and: “I’ve never bought my own clothes – my mum buys them for me. But now that I know what I can look like, I’d like to dress like this more often.”

Some critics like UK’s Times Online aren’t buying Semenya’s timely make-over or the necessity for her to even force a feminine appearance, calling her a pawn in the politics of sports.

Material Mom Madonna Set to Adopt Malawian Orphan Mercy James

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Madonna reportedly will get her way, according to The Sun, which claims the Material Mom has persuaded three appeal judges to allow her to adopt Malawian orphan Mercy James.

Madonna, 50, whose application for the three-year-old was rejected in March, will get her new ruling next Sunday at Malawi’s Supreme Court of Appeal.

“All recommendations are in favour of the adoption taking place,” a source reveals. “Mercy should start packing her bags. She’s off to America.”

Madonna Picks Out Second African Child, Malawi Girl Mercy James

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Madonna is expected to arrive in Malawi this weekend to spend time with Mercy Jones, the Malawian girl she has picked to be her next adopted child.

Even though she faced harsh criticism when adopting David Banda from Malawi, one of Africa’s poorest countries, the 50 year-old singer forges ahead with plans to adopt again.

Mercy Jones is 4 years old and comes from the same orphanage as Banda. Both of her parents are deceased but her grandmother Lucy Chekechiwa, 61, claims it had been agreed that she would take custody of Jones at the age of six and accuses Madonna of “stealing.”

“Why doesn’t this singer pick other children? It is stealing. I want to go to court, I won’t let her go,” Chekechiwa said.

Madonna recently divorced film director Guy Ritchie and has two other children, Lourdes, 12, and Rocco, 8, in addition to 3 year-old Banda.

PHOTO CREDIT: Reuters

VIDEO VIRUS: Salma Hayek Breastfeeds African Baby In Sierra Leone


Actress and UNICEF spokesperson Salma Hayek made an effort to feed Africa one baby at a time when she breastfed a newborn during a visit to the West African country Sierra Leone in September.

The well-endowed 42-year-old actress, who is nursing her own daughter Valentina, offered to breastfeed the baby because the mother didn’t have enough milk.

“The baby was perfectly healthy, but the mother didn’t have milk. He was very hungry. I was weaning Valentina, but I still had a lot of milk that I was pumping, so I breast-fed the baby,” Hayek says.

What’s even more priceless than Hayek lending her breast to humanity is the story she tells of how her great grandmother once “took her breast out” and fed a stranger’s child on the street.

Colin Powell Sings And Dances “Yahoozee” At Africa Rising Concert


General Colin Powell showed off some hip-hop dance moves during an impromptu performance on Tuesday at the Africa Rising festival in London.

The former Secretary of State joined the Nigerian group Olu Maintain as they sang and danced to their hit song “Yahoozee.” Christina Aguilera and Seal also performed at the event.

Before busting a move, Powell addressed the audience:

I stand before you tonight as an African American. Many people say to me, ‘You became Secretary of State of the USA, is it really necessary to say you are an African American, or that you are black?’ And I say yes, so that we can remind our children. It took a lot of people struggling to bring me to this point in history. I didn’t just drop out of the sky, people came from my continent in chains.

Colin Powell has yet to endorse a presidential candidate, and we’re wondering if his speech means he’ll be backing Obama. We’re also wondering if Powell knew the song “Yahoozee” refers to the slang term “yahoo boyz” which means internet scammers.

PHOTO CREDIT: PRESS ASSOCIATION

Ga Ga: K’Naan Kicks Off US Tour with Surprise Performance by Mos Def in New York

Canadian poet and hip hop artist from Somalia K’Naan kicked off his US tour at Le Poisson Rouge in New York’s Greenwich Village Thursday night.

During his performance, the thought-provoking lyricist surprised an eclectic crowd of fans when rapper-actor Mos Def joined him during his set. Mos Def has said K’Naan can “make a song anywhere…out of anything!”

During his show, K’Naan also previewed music from his upcoming LP Troubadour, which like his debut album The Dusty Foot Philosopher, chronicles his rise from the rough war-torn streets of Somalia.

Like most hip-hop artists, K’Naan explores themes of gun and street violence, but chooses to yield his troubled years as a youth in a more eloquent and thoughtful manner. Blindie’s just ga ga over this award-winning folk-rap artist and looks forward to hearing more from him in the future!

The Jamaica Observer: “Slavery Was Good For The Black Man”

Blindie stumbled upon a Jamaica Observer , praising slavery as “our most important contact with modernity,” in which “blacks were able to understand some of the principles of global trade.” It seems to be written by a black man, as he uses the collective ‘we’ throughout his outrageous article.

The author Michael Dingwall argues that when Europeans came to Africa to buy slaves, they found “a society and people vastly inferior to theirs” because Africans “had not developed” the “concept of nation or government,” “science and technology,” and “as a people, we had no sense of self-identity…we were uncivilised.”

Had Dingwall done his research, he would’ve learned that the origins of politics, science, technology and civilized kingdoms originated in Africa and the colonization and kidnapping of its people divided nations and severely stunted her growth.

When Europeans were living in caves and dressing in animal skins, Africans were building kingdoms, mapping the stars, pondering life after death, and building pyramids of mathematical proportions.

Dingwall even overlooks the psychological repercussions of slavery and the institutionalized racism that went along with it, further claiming, “We blacks were changed, for the better, I might add, on account of slavery. We are a better race today because our ancestors went though slavery.”