Chris Rock takes a candid look at the world and business of black hair in his documentary Good Hair.

With celebrities like Kerry Washington, Nia Long, Paul Mooney, Megan Good, Raven SymonĂ©, Maya Angelou, and Reverend Al Sharpton offering their views on ‘good hair’ via relaxers and weaves, the film looks like it’s bringing the LOLs!

Blindie especially likes the discussion on weave sex by Nia Long, and you can never fail with Mr. Mooney’s deadpan delivery (while rocking an super-sized afro wig): “If your hair is relaxed, white people are relaxed…if your hair is nappy, they’re not happy!”

Good Hair hits theaters in October

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The Unborn may have some fundamental problems like underdeveloped characters that live in insanely large houses, shallow dialogue that has supporting actress Meagan Good saying “dude” one too many times, and a contrived plot that relies on the holocaust and too much CGI, but it thankfully breaks a few of the horor film stereotypes by featuring Judaism as a device and more than one black character in a prominent role.

Megan Good plays the usual black girl best friend complete with sassy dialogue but manages to survive for at least an hour, almost a record for a horror film! When Good does bite it in full-on Exorcist style her quota is quickly filled by Idris Elba as one of the most important elements in a supernatural flick -a priest!

Sadly, Elba isn’t the saviour of the film because Catholicism takes a backset to Judaism as the force that can drive back the evil that “wants to be born,” but not since Demi Moore’s The Seventh Sign have we seen so many Jewish elements in a scare-fest. Granted the rabbi is played by a clean-shaven, payos-free (the sidecurls worn by many orthodox rabbis) Gary Oldman who comes off as more of an English professor, and the red Kabbalah strings made us cringe because of the obvious Hollywood connection, at least the film was original in it’s portrayal of race and religion.

The Unborn is currently in theaters and also stars Cloverfield‘s Odette Yustman.

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