Quantcast

Archives for Uncategorized

Hollywood Legend Lena Horne Dies at 92

The legendary singer and actress Lena Horne died Sunday at New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center. The 92 year-old entertainer started her six-decade career as a chorus girl at Harlem's Cotton Club during the depression in 1933 and later went on to star in Hollywood musicals including "Stormy Weather," in which she sang the signature song and became most known for. She became the first black person to appear on the cover of a movie magazine, Motion Picture, as her appearance was deemed "safe" and "acceptable" by white Hollywood. "I was unique in that I was a kind of black that white people could accept," Horne once said. "I was their daydream. I had the worst kind of acceptance because it was never for how great I was or what I contributed. It was because of the way I looked." Born in Brooklyn to a upward middle-class family, her grandmother, a prominent member of the Urban League and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, enrolled her in the NAACP at the young age of 2. But Horne did not play an active role in race relations until 1945 when she turned her back on POW German soldiers to sing to Black American soldiers who were seated in back of them. In the early '60s, Horne became more active in the civil-rights movement, participating in a meeting with prominent blacks in 1963 with then-Attorney General Robert Kennedy in the wake of violence in Birmingham, Ala., and singing at civil rights rallies. Horne was a Kennedy Center Honors recipient in 1984, and received a lifetime achievement award from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences in 1998.
Read More

WATCH THIS: Short and Romantic on a Low Budget

Don't let the name fool you, this independent short is less about romance and more about urban gentrification. Two people ruminate over a recent stabbing in one of those typical conversations where a local tries to scare a newbie with tales of the neighborhoods criminal past, complete with references to rap songs and mayhem in a third world country. Written and directed by Neil Drumming and starring Gbenga Akinnagbe and Sofia Regan, Romantic was produced on a shoe-string budget. Shot on HD with a Canon HV30 in a studio, the short makes use of some creative production by subbing actual urban streets for a green screen backdrop and some photography of stereotpical Brooklyn shots -brownstones, graffiti, bodegas, and of course a liquor store.
Read More

Obama Wins Nobel Peace Prize -Critics Even More Annoyed

obamaMuch to the chagrin of Republicans and haters everywhere, President Barack Obama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. The Norwegian Nobel Committee praised the President's "efforts to strengthen international diplomacy," his "vision of and work for a world without nuclear weapons" and for inspiring hope and creating "a new climate in international politics." Obama responded to the honor saying he was surprised and deeply humbled. "Let me be clear: I do not view it as a recognition of my own accomplishments, but rather as an affirmation of American leadership on behalf of aspirations held by people in all nations," hesaid. "To be honest, I do not feel that I deserve to be in the company of so many of the transformative figures who've been honored by this prize." And what did all the critics say? "Apparently Nobel Prizes are now being awarded to anyone who is not George Bush," Air America correspondent Ana Marie Cox wrote on Twitter. Washington Post blogger Ezra Klein also commented on Twitter: "Obama also awarded Nobel Prize in chemistry. 'He's just got great chemistry,' says Nobel committee." The Daily Beast's Peter Beinart wrote: "I like Barack Obama as much as the next liberal, but this is a farce." And Michael Russnow wrote on the Huffington Post that he too is an Obama supporter but, "Whatever Happened to Awarding for Deeds Actually Done?" horbjoern Jagland, chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, told the AP, "Some people say — and I understand it — 'Isn't it premature? Too early?' Well, I'd say then that it could be too late to respond three years from now," T "It is now that we have the opportunity to respond — all of us." Obama is the third sitting U.S. president to win the award after President Theodore Roosevelt in 1906 and President Woodrow Wilson in 1919. He plans to donate the cash prize of $1.4 million to charity.
Read More

Obama Calls Kanye West “Jackass” for MTV Outburst

In what sounded like an off-the-record conversation before a press conference on Tuesday, President Barack Obama called Kanye West a "jackass" for rudely interrupting Taylor Swift acceptance speech during the MTV VMAs on Sunday. "I thought that was really inappropriate, you know. I mean it's like, she's gettin' an award, what're you butting in? I hear you. I agree with you. The young lady seems like a perfectly nice person, she's getting her award, what's he doing up there? He's a jackass." Obama also made light of the informal banter and the tendency for the press to scrutinize his every word and action by saying, "Come on guys, cut the President some slack, I've got a lot on my plate," and went on to refer to his fly catching incident which was caught on tape and blown out of proportion.
Read More

Obama Delivers Controversial Speech To School Children

President Barack Obama delivered a televised speech to school children across the country from the Wakefield High School in Arlington, Virginia on Monday amidst controversy and protests. Even though other presidents have delivered back-to-school addresses, Obama's speech was met with harsh criticism as some accuse him of trying to push his agenda directly to children. Before his speech, the President met with a group of Wakefield students for an informal discussion where he warned the high-schoolers of the perils of posting on Facebook saying, "be careful what you post on Facebook. Whatever you do, it will be pulled up later in your life." Obama stressed the importance of taking responsibility and committing to succeed during his speech and said, "At the end of the day, the circumstances of your life, what you look like, where you come from, how much money you have, what you have going on at home, none of that is an excuse for neglecting your homework or having a bad attitude in school. "There is no excuse for not trying. Where you are right now doesn't have to determine where you'll end up. No one's written your destiny for you because here in America you write your own destiny. You make your own future."
Read More

Categories

Search

Categories

Search

Archives for Uncategorized

Hollywood Legend Lena Horne Dies at 92

The legendary singer and actress Lena Horne died Sunday at New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center. The 92 year-old entertainer started her six-decade career as a chorus girl at Harlem's Cotton Club during the depression in 1933 and later went on to star in Hollywood musicals including "Stormy Weather," in which she sang the signature song and became most known for. She became the first black person to appear on the cover of a movie magazine, Motion Picture, as her appearance was deemed "safe" and "acceptable" by white Hollywood. "I was unique in that I was a kind of black that white people could accept," Horne once said. "I was their daydream. I had the worst kind of acceptance because it was never for how great I was or what I contributed. It was because of the way I looked." Born in Brooklyn to a upward middle-class family, her grandmother, a prominent member of the Urban League and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, enrolled her in the NAACP at the young age of 2. But Horne did not play an active role in race relations until 1945 when she turned her back on POW German soldiers to sing to Black American soldiers who were seated in back of them. In the early '60s, Horne became more active in the civil-rights movement, participating in a meeting with prominent blacks in 1963 with then-Attorney General Robert Kennedy in the wake of violence in Birmingham, Ala., and singing at civil rights rallies. Horne was a Kennedy Center Honors recipient in 1984, and received a lifetime achievement award from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences in 1998.
Read More

WATCH THIS: Short and Romantic on a Low Budget

Don't let the name fool you, this independent short is less about romance and more about urban gentrification. Two people ruminate over a recent stabbing in one of those typical conversations where a local tries to scare a newbie with tales of the neighborhoods criminal past, complete with references to rap songs and mayhem in a third world country. Written and directed by Neil Drumming and starring Gbenga Akinnagbe and Sofia Regan, Romantic was produced on a shoe-string budget. Shot on HD with a Canon HV30 in a studio, the short makes use of some creative production by subbing actual urban streets for a green screen backdrop and some photography of stereotpical Brooklyn shots -brownstones, graffiti, bodegas, and of course a liquor store.
Read More

Obama Wins Nobel Peace Prize -Critics Even More Annoyed

obamaMuch to the chagrin of Republicans and haters everywhere, President Barack Obama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. The Norwegian Nobel Committee praised the President's "efforts to strengthen international diplomacy," his "vision of and work for a world without nuclear weapons" and for inspiring hope and creating "a new climate in international politics." Obama responded to the honor saying he was surprised and deeply humbled. "Let me be clear: I do not view it as a recognition of my own accomplishments, but rather as an affirmation of American leadership on behalf of aspirations held by people in all nations," hesaid. "To be honest, I do not feel that I deserve to be in the company of so many of the transformative figures who've been honored by this prize." And what did all the critics say? "Apparently Nobel Prizes are now being awarded to anyone who is not George Bush," Air America correspondent Ana Marie Cox wrote on Twitter. Washington Post blogger Ezra Klein also commented on Twitter: "Obama also awarded Nobel Prize in chemistry. 'He's just got great chemistry,' says Nobel committee." The Daily Beast's Peter Beinart wrote: "I like Barack Obama as much as the next liberal, but this is a farce." And Michael Russnow wrote on the Huffington Post that he too is an Obama supporter but, "Whatever Happened to Awarding for Deeds Actually Done?" horbjoern Jagland, chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, told the AP, "Some people say — and I understand it — 'Isn't it premature? Too early?' Well, I'd say then that it could be too late to respond three years from now," T "It is now that we have the opportunity to respond — all of us." Obama is the third sitting U.S. president to win the award after President Theodore Roosevelt in 1906 and President Woodrow Wilson in 1919. He plans to donate the cash prize of $1.4 million to charity.
Read More

Obama Calls Kanye West “Jackass” for MTV Outburst

In what sounded like an off-the-record conversation before a press conference on Tuesday, President Barack Obama called Kanye West a "jackass" for rudely interrupting Taylor Swift acceptance speech during the MTV VMAs on Sunday. "I thought that was really inappropriate, you know. I mean it's like, she's gettin' an award, what're you butting in? I hear you. I agree with you. The young lady seems like a perfectly nice person, she's getting her award, what's he doing up there? He's a jackass." Obama also made light of the informal banter and the tendency for the press to scrutinize his every word and action by saying, "Come on guys, cut the President some slack, I've got a lot on my plate," and went on to refer to his fly catching incident which was caught on tape and blown out of proportion.
Read More

Obama Delivers Controversial Speech To School Children

President Barack Obama delivered a televised speech to school children across the country from the Wakefield High School in Arlington, Virginia on Monday amidst controversy and protests. Even though other presidents have delivered back-to-school addresses, Obama's speech was met with harsh criticism as some accuse him of trying to push his agenda directly to children. Before his speech, the President met with a group of Wakefield students for an informal discussion where he warned the high-schoolers of the perils of posting on Facebook saying, "be careful what you post on Facebook. Whatever you do, it will be pulled up later in your life." Obama stressed the importance of taking responsibility and committing to succeed during his speech and said, "At the end of the day, the circumstances of your life, what you look like, where you come from, how much money you have, what you have going on at home, none of that is an excuse for neglecting your homework or having a bad attitude in school. "There is no excuse for not trying. Where you are right now doesn't have to determine where you'll end up. No one's written your destiny for you because here in America you write your own destiny. You make your own future."
Read More