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Derek Jeter Said What About 50 Cent?

Rumors are swirling that Former Yankees player Derek Jeter pulled out of an underwear deal when he learned that 50 Cent was going to be part of the deal also, citing 50 as being too “urban,” which is code for BLACK. But isn’t Derek Jeter half black, you ask? That he is, and of course there is more to the story. Mathias Ingvarsson, a majority owner of Frigo, a men’s underwear company claims in a lawsuit that Jeter signed a 3-year publicity contract with the brand, but in 2013 when the underwear line approached rapper 50 Cent to come aboard,
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Former NBA All-Star Vin Baker Now Working at StarBucks -and That’s Great!

Vin Baker was an NBA All-Star four times and an Olympic gold winner before ending his basketball career after the 2005/6 season. Now he’s working at a Starbucks in North Kingstown, Rhode Island, in the hopes of becoming a full-time manager. What’s so great about working at Starbucks when Baker once earned a reported $100 million playing basketball? Well, for starters he used to be an alcoholic, but now he’s sober and holding down a job. He also has the humility and determination to keep moving on and take a regular job similar to the type of jobs the majority
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Jimmie Walker Says Caitlyn Jenner Was Awarded at ESPY for “Ratings, Ratings, Ratings.”

Jimmie Walker, that DY-NO-MITE actor from Good Times says Caitlyn Jenner was awarded the Arthur Ashe Courage Award for “ratings,” and agrees she was basically pimped out by ESPN to get those ratings for the network’s ESPY Award show. When asked why Jenner would be awarded the Arthur Ashe Award of Courage for transitioning to a woman but not for his previous Olympic accomplishments, Walker replied: “Ratings. Ratings, ratings, ratings…If you notice, it moved from ESPN to ABC, that’s why”
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Jason Bent, aka Simon Brodkin, Who Rushed Kanye West Onstage at Glastonbury Festival, Makes It Rain on FIFA President

British Comedian Simon Brodkin crashed a press conference today in Zurich and “made it rain” on FIFA President Sepp Blatter. Brodkin, as the character Jason Bent, which he popularized on his BBC comedy show Lee Nelson’s Well Good Show, interrupted Blatter as he was about to speak on reform within the scandal-plagued soccer organization. You may remember Brodkin for crashing Kanye West’s performance during the Glastonbury Festival. Well good, indeed! Brodkin not only made a mockery of Blatter, whose top agency executives have been arrested  on charges of bribery and corruption, but the comedian properly used American dollars (fake though)
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AARP Tweets a Diss to Tiger Woods

At a press conference on Tuesday, reporters asked Tiger Woods about retiring to which the 39-year-old pro-golfer replied, “yeah, umm, retirement? <coughs> uh, I don’t have an AARP card yet so…” (laughter ensues) Well, apparently laughter was not ensuing over at AARP. The retirement organization took to Twitter after Woods’ abysmal first round at The Open Championship on Thursday afternoon in Scotland -a 76-stroke score, his worst in four Opens there -and fired back a biting Tweet: Touché, AARP! Touché!  
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Magic Johnson’s “Announcement’

It's been over 20 years since Magic Johnson announced to the world that he was HIV positive and changed the face of AIDS. "Because of the HIV virus I have attained," he said. "I will have to retire from the Lakers." But he didn't retire from life, as he became a successful businessman, a television host, an advocate and a grandfather. Magic and his wife Cookie talk about how difficult that day was and the events that led up to it in the documentary "The Announcement", directed by Nelson George. "It's not so much what people said about him, it's how he felt and what people did to him," George said. "Be it people dis-inviting him to their restaurant or dealing with how [the drug] AZT affected his body. It's an inside-out view as opposed to the things you might have heard discussed on talk radio." The Announcement airs on ESPN tonight at 9pm.  
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Grant Hill Shuts Down Fab Five’s Jalen Rose in NY Times Sports Blog!

In this NY Time Sports blog, Grant Hill responds, in an articulate and educated manner, to Jalen Rose's derogatory comments against him and other Duke basketball players made during the ESPN documentary The Fab Five. March 16, 2011, 1:47 pm Grant Hill’s Response to Jalen Rose By Grant HIll “The Fab Five,” an ESPN film about the Michigan basketball careers of Jalen Rose, Juwan Howard, Chris Webber, Jimmy King and Ray Jackson from 1991 to 1993, was broadcast for the first time Sunday night. In the show, Rose, the show’s executive producer, stated that Duke recruited only black players he considered to be “Uncle Toms.” Grant Hill, a player on the Duke team that beat Michigan in the 1992 Final Four, reflected on Rose’s comments. I am a fan, friend and longtime competitor of the Fab Five. I have competed against Jalen Rose and Chris Webber since the age of 13. At Michigan, the Fab Five represented a cultural phenomenon that impacted the country in a permanent and positive way. The very idea of the Fab Five elicited pride and promise in much the same way the Georgetown teams did in the mid-1980s when I was in high school and idolized them. Their journey from youthful icons to successful men today is a road map for so many young, black men (and women) who saw their journey through the powerful documentary, “The Fab Five.” It was a sad and somewhat pathetic turn of events, therefore, to see friends narrating this interesting documentary about their moment in time and calling me a bitch and worse, calling all black players at Duke “Uncle Toms” and, to some degree, disparaging my parents for their education, work ethic and commitment to each other and to me. I should have guessed there was something regrettable in the documentary when I received a Twitter apology from Jalen before its premiere. I am aware Jalen has gone to some length to explain his remarks about my family in numerous interviews, so I believe he has some admiration for them. In his garbled but sweeping comment that Duke recruits only “black players that were ‘Uncle Toms,’ ” Jalen seems to change the usual meaning of those very vitriolic words into his own meaning, i.e., blacks from two-parent, middle-class families. He leaves us all guessing exactly what he believes today. I am beyond fortunate to have two parents who are still working well into their 60s. They received great educations and use them every day. My parents taught me a personal ethic I try to live by and pass on to my children. I come from a strong legacy of black Americans. My namesake, Henry Hill, my father’s father, was a day laborer in Baltimore. He could not read or write until he was taught to do so by my grandmother. His first present to my dad was a set of encyclopedias, which I now have. He wanted his only child, my father, to have a good education, so he made numerous sacrifices to see that he got an education, including attending Yale. This is part of our great tradition as black Americans. We aspire for the best or better for our children and work hard to make that happen for them. Jalen’s mother is part of our great black tradition and made the same sacrifices for him. My teammates at Duke — all of them, black and white — were a band of brothers who came together to play at the highest level for the best coach in basketball. I know most of the black players who preceded and followed me at Duke. They all contribute to our tradition of excellence on the court. It is insulting and ignorant to suggest that men like Johnny Dawkins (coach at Stanford), Tommy Amaker (coach at Harvard), Billy King (general manager of the Nets), Tony Lang (coach of the Mitsubishi Diamond Dolphins in Japan), Thomas Hill (small-business owner in Texas), Jeff Capel (former coach at Oklahoma and Virginia Commonwealth), Kenny Blakeney (assistant coach at Harvard), Jay Williams (ESPN analyst), Shane Battier (Memphis Grizzlies) and Chris Duhon (Orlando Magic) ever sold out their race. To hint that those who grew up in a household with a mother and father are somehow less black than those who did not is beyond ridiculous. All of us are extremely proud of the current Duke team, especially Nolan Smith. He was raised by his mother, plays in memory of his late father and carries himself with the pride and confidence that they instilled in him. The sacrifice, the effort, the education and the friendships I experienced in my four years are cherished. The many Duke graduates I have met around the world are also my “family,” and they are a special group of people. A good education is a privilege. Just as Jalen has founded a charter school in Michigan, we are expected to use our education to help others, to improve life for those who need our assistance and to use the excellent education we have received to better the world. A highlight of my time at Duke was getting to know the great John Hope Franklin, James B. Duke Professor of History and the leading scholar of the last century on the total history of African-Americans in this country. His insights and perspectives contributed significantly to my overall development and helped me understand myself, my forefathers and my place in the world. Ad ingenium faciendum, toward the building of character, is a phrase I recently heard. To me, it is the essence of an educational experience. Struggling, succeeding, trying again and having fun within a nurturing but competitive environment built character in all of us, including every black graduate of Duke. My mother always says, “You can live without Chaucer and you can live without calculus, but you cannot make it in the wide, wide world without common sense.” As we get older, we understand the importance of these words. Adulthood is nothing but a series of choices: you can say yes or no, but you cannot avoid saying one or the other. In the end, those who are successful are those who adjust and adapt to the decisions they have made and make the best of them. I caution my fabulous five friends to avoid stereotyping me and others they do not know in much the same way so many people stereotyped them back then for their appearance and swagger. I wish for you the restoration of the bond that made you friends, brothers and icons. I am proud of my family. I am proud of my Duke championships and all my Duke teammates. And, I am proud I never lost a game against the Fab Five. Grant Henry Hill Phoenix Suns Duke ‘94
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Archives for Sports

Derek Jeter Said What About 50 Cent?

Rumors are swirling that Former Yankees player Derek Jeter pulled out of an underwear deal when he learned that 50 Cent was going to be part of the deal also, citing 50 as being too “urban,” which is code for BLACK. But isn’t Derek Jeter half black, you ask? That he is, and of course there is more to the story. Mathias Ingvarsson, a majority owner of Frigo, a men’s underwear company claims in a lawsuit that Jeter signed a 3-year publicity contract with the brand, but in 2013 when the underwear line approached rapper 50 Cent to come aboard,
Read More

Former NBA All-Star Vin Baker Now Working at StarBucks -and That’s Great!

Vin Baker was an NBA All-Star four times and an Olympic gold winner before ending his basketball career after the 2005/6 season. Now he’s working at a Starbucks in North Kingstown, Rhode Island, in the hopes of becoming a full-time manager. What’s so great about working at Starbucks when Baker once earned a reported $100 million playing basketball? Well, for starters he used to be an alcoholic, but now he’s sober and holding down a job. He also has the humility and determination to keep moving on and take a regular job similar to the type of jobs the majority
Read More

Jimmie Walker Says Caitlyn Jenner Was Awarded at ESPY for “Ratings, Ratings, Ratings.”

Jimmie Walker, that DY-NO-MITE actor from Good Times says Caitlyn Jenner was awarded the Arthur Ashe Courage Award for “ratings,” and agrees she was basically pimped out by ESPN to get those ratings for the network’s ESPY Award show. When asked why Jenner would be awarded the Arthur Ashe Award of Courage for transitioning to a woman but not for his previous Olympic accomplishments, Walker replied: “Ratings. Ratings, ratings, ratings…If you notice, it moved from ESPN to ABC, that’s why”
Read More

Jason Bent, aka Simon Brodkin, Who Rushed Kanye West Onstage at Glastonbury Festival, Makes It Rain on FIFA President

British Comedian Simon Brodkin crashed a press conference today in Zurich and “made it rain” on FIFA President Sepp Blatter. Brodkin, as the character Jason Bent, which he popularized on his BBC comedy show Lee Nelson’s Well Good Show, interrupted Blatter as he was about to speak on reform within the scandal-plagued soccer organization. You may remember Brodkin for crashing Kanye West’s performance during the Glastonbury Festival. Well good, indeed! Brodkin not only made a mockery of Blatter, whose top agency executives have been arrested  on charges of bribery and corruption, but the comedian properly used American dollars (fake though)
Read More

AARP Tweets a Diss to Tiger Woods

At a press conference on Tuesday, reporters asked Tiger Woods about retiring to which the 39-year-old pro-golfer replied, “yeah, umm, retirement? <coughs> uh, I don’t have an AARP card yet so…” (laughter ensues) Well, apparently laughter was not ensuing over at AARP. The retirement organization took to Twitter after Woods’ abysmal first round at The Open Championship on Thursday afternoon in Scotland -a 76-stroke score, his worst in four Opens there -and fired back a biting Tweet: Touché, AARP! Touché!  
Read More

Magic Johnson’s “Announcement’

It's been over 20 years since Magic Johnson announced to the world that he was HIV positive and changed the face of AIDS. "Because of the HIV virus I have attained," he said. "I will have to retire from the Lakers." But he didn't retire from life, as he became a successful businessman, a television host, an advocate and a grandfather. Magic and his wife Cookie talk about how difficult that day was and the events that led up to it in the documentary "The Announcement", directed by Nelson George. "It's not so much what people said about him, it's how he felt and what people did to him," George said. "Be it people dis-inviting him to their restaurant or dealing with how [the drug] AZT affected his body. It's an inside-out view as opposed to the things you might have heard discussed on talk radio." The Announcement airs on ESPN tonight at 9pm.  
Read More

Grant Hill Shuts Down Fab Five’s Jalen Rose in NY Times Sports Blog!

In this NY Time Sports blog, Grant Hill responds, in an articulate and educated manner, to Jalen Rose's derogatory comments against him and other Duke basketball players made during the ESPN documentary The Fab Five. March 16, 2011, 1:47 pm Grant Hill’s Response to Jalen Rose By Grant HIll “The Fab Five,” an ESPN film about the Michigan basketball careers of Jalen Rose, Juwan Howard, Chris Webber, Jimmy King and Ray Jackson from 1991 to 1993, was broadcast for the first time Sunday night. In the show, Rose, the show’s executive producer, stated that Duke recruited only black players he considered to be “Uncle Toms.” Grant Hill, a player on the Duke team that beat Michigan in the 1992 Final Four, reflected on Rose’s comments. I am a fan, friend and longtime competitor of the Fab Five. I have competed against Jalen Rose and Chris Webber since the age of 13. At Michigan, the Fab Five represented a cultural phenomenon that impacted the country in a permanent and positive way. The very idea of the Fab Five elicited pride and promise in much the same way the Georgetown teams did in the mid-1980s when I was in high school and idolized them. Their journey from youthful icons to successful men today is a road map for so many young, black men (and women) who saw their journey through the powerful documentary, “The Fab Five.” It was a sad and somewhat pathetic turn of events, therefore, to see friends narrating this interesting documentary about their moment in time and calling me a bitch and worse, calling all black players at Duke “Uncle Toms” and, to some degree, disparaging my parents for their education, work ethic and commitment to each other and to me. I should have guessed there was something regrettable in the documentary when I received a Twitter apology from Jalen before its premiere. I am aware Jalen has gone to some length to explain his remarks about my family in numerous interviews, so I believe he has some admiration for them. In his garbled but sweeping comment that Duke recruits only “black players that were ‘Uncle Toms,’ ” Jalen seems to change the usual meaning of those very vitriolic words into his own meaning, i.e., blacks from two-parent, middle-class families. He leaves us all guessing exactly what he believes today. I am beyond fortunate to have two parents who are still working well into their 60s. They received great educations and use them every day. My parents taught me a personal ethic I try to live by and pass on to my children. I come from a strong legacy of black Americans. My namesake, Henry Hill, my father’s father, was a day laborer in Baltimore. He could not read or write until he was taught to do so by my grandmother. His first present to my dad was a set of encyclopedias, which I now have. He wanted his only child, my father, to have a good education, so he made numerous sacrifices to see that he got an education, including attending Yale. This is part of our great tradition as black Americans. We aspire for the best or better for our children and work hard to make that happen for them. Jalen’s mother is part of our great black tradition and made the same sacrifices for him. My teammates at Duke — all of them, black and white — were a band of brothers who came together to play at the highest level for the best coach in basketball. I know most of the black players who preceded and followed me at Duke. They all contribute to our tradition of excellence on the court. It is insulting and ignorant to suggest that men like Johnny Dawkins (coach at Stanford), Tommy Amaker (coach at Harvard), Billy King (general manager of the Nets), Tony Lang (coach of the Mitsubishi Diamond Dolphins in Japan), Thomas Hill (small-business owner in Texas), Jeff Capel (former coach at Oklahoma and Virginia Commonwealth), Kenny Blakeney (assistant coach at Harvard), Jay Williams (ESPN analyst), Shane Battier (Memphis Grizzlies) and Chris Duhon (Orlando Magic) ever sold out their race. To hint that those who grew up in a household with a mother and father are somehow less black than those who did not is beyond ridiculous. All of us are extremely proud of the current Duke team, especially Nolan Smith. He was raised by his mother, plays in memory of his late father and carries himself with the pride and confidence that they instilled in him. The sacrifice, the effort, the education and the friendships I experienced in my four years are cherished. The many Duke graduates I have met around the world are also my “family,” and they are a special group of people. A good education is a privilege. Just as Jalen has founded a charter school in Michigan, we are expected to use our education to help others, to improve life for those who need our assistance and to use the excellent education we have received to better the world. A highlight of my time at Duke was getting to know the great John Hope Franklin, James B. Duke Professor of History and the leading scholar of the last century on the total history of African-Americans in this country. His insights and perspectives contributed significantly to my overall development and helped me understand myself, my forefathers and my place in the world. Ad ingenium faciendum, toward the building of character, is a phrase I recently heard. To me, it is the essence of an educational experience. Struggling, succeeding, trying again and having fun within a nurturing but competitive environment built character in all of us, including every black graduate of Duke. My mother always says, “You can live without Chaucer and you can live without calculus, but you cannot make it in the wide, wide world without common sense.” As we get older, we understand the importance of these words. Adulthood is nothing but a series of choices: you can say yes or no, but you cannot avoid saying one or the other. In the end, those who are successful are those who adjust and adapt to the decisions they have made and make the best of them. I caution my fabulous five friends to avoid stereotyping me and others they do not know in much the same way so many people stereotyped them back then for their appearance and swagger. I wish for you the restoration of the bond that made you friends, brothers and icons. I am proud of my family. I am proud of my Duke championships and all my Duke teammates. And, I am proud I never lost a game against the Fab Five. Grant Henry Hill Phoenix Suns Duke ‘94
Read More