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EMS Workers Fired Over KKK Photos

Three paramedic trainees (identified as Timothy Prahm, Henry Solares and Thomas Hart), who were training at Newark's University Hospital in New Jersey, were fired by the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, after cell phone images of two of them dressed in white robes holding a large wooden cross surfaced. The university's president, William F. Owen Jr., said in a written statement, "[The university] has never and will never tolerate attitudes and behaviors that discriminate against any individual or group." He also added that the incident appeared to be a hazing by EMS: "You can't make this stuff up. It's like being in Tennessee in the 1950s."
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MUST SEE: The Supreme’s Costume Exhibit

More than 50 outfits (in addition to a collection of photos, album covers, and live footage) are on display at London's Victoria and Albert Museum until October. In a much-deserving exhibit, "The Story of the Supremes," tracks the Motown trio as the epitome of glamour that set a groundbreaking standard for future girl group molds. Not only did they set an example for En Vogue and Destiny's Child, but The Supremes changed the world's perception of African-Americans, proving that black is beautiful! "When I saw the Supremes on TV...it was magical to me because I had never seen black women on television or anywhere for that matter who conveyed such glamour and such grace," Oprah Winfrey said of seeing The Supremes for the first time on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964. O.G. Supreme Mary Wilson said before the opening last May, "I have kept these dresses in storage for over 30 years, it was my dream that one day I could share them with the world.''
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Benihana Founder Hiroaki Aoki Dies

Tokyo-born restauranteur Hiroaki 'Rocky' Aoki died on Thursday in New York City at the age of 69. The father of model Devon Aoki and DJ Steve Aoki succumbed to pneumonia due to complication from cancer, but had also suffered from diabetes, cirrhosis of the liver and hepatitis C--which he contracted from a blood transfusion. A former wrestler on the Japanese Olympic team, Aoki moved to New York after failing to qualify for the 1960 games in Rome. He went on to open his first teppanyaki-styled restaurant in 1964, with $10,000 he earned selling ice cream from a truck. Aoki had resigned from the company in 1998 after pleading guilty to an inside trade and had been acting as a consultant to the chain, which included over 85 restaurants worldwide. A self-proclaimed "risk-taker" Aoki drove in the 1970s Cannonball Run, an underground cross-country race, competed in offshore powerboat racing, and became the first person to cross the Pacific Ocean in a hot-air balloon in the early 1980s, setting a world record.
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Medicine’s Racial Divide

The American Medical Association apologized to black doctors, admitting to a history of racial discrimination in its policies and practices. Dr. Ronald Davis, the AMA’s previous president, says the group has "a feeling of profound regret and embarrassment for what has been uncovered." Dr. Nelson Adams, who was most recently the president of the National Medical Association, which was founded in 1895 to represent black doctors, says, "[The] AMA looked the other way when local medical associations worked to exclude most black physicians from becoming members." The AMA apology is prompted by a study commissioned in 2005 titled, “The Racial Divide in Organized Medicine,” which will be published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. It was only on Saturday that a state study showed that in New York City, black nurses were being paid less than their white counterparts.
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Ga Ga: Designer Adama Kargbo Makes Fashion, Not War

Escaping the confines of civil war, Sierra Leone native Adama Kargbo, 24, has spun the wounds from her country and the skills she sharpened at the prestigious Parsons the New School for Design into a couture line. Called Aschobi, Kargbo's high-end line is based in Freetown, the capitol of her war-shattered West African country, according to GOOD Magazine, which says her "clothes give traditional African style an urban twist." On her line's Facebook page, Kargbo describes her mission as seeking to "Africanize the fashion industry, removing the African from exotic to everyday while at the same time continuing the legacy of African Couture as was begun in Dakar and Bamako in the 1950s." PHOTO: Henry Jacobson
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Chanel Iman Still Passed Over in Fashion

Even after fashion bible Vogue asked, "Is fashion racist?" Chanel Iman is still passed over for modeling jobs, the 17-year-old It Girl—and our favorite model of the moment—tells Newsweek. "I will fly to London for what is supposed to be 20 casting calls and won't get but 15 because the other five designers don't want black models," says Chanel Iman, who is currently in Gap billboards around the country and is arguably the hottest black fashion model (next to Liya Kebede). "That's not going to happen to white models. It's upsetting and insulting and totally backwards.'' Supermodel Naomi Campbell also chimes in, "This is not the conversation I thought I would have to have at this point. You think you've broken the barriers and then the game changes. So you have to fight all over again."
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Outarra And Samuelsson Bring the Spice

Ivory Coast native Morou Outtara and Ethiopian-born Marcuss Samuelsson are the latest culinary artists infusing the American palate with bold flavors from Africa. Outtara peppers the food at his Virginia restaurant, Farrah Olivia, with flavors from his West African homeland and thinks America is ready for the new tastes. "For six, seven years now people are playing with the idea of African food, and people are now starting to accept it," Outtara said in an interview with Philly.com. "It's been gradually happening," said Samuelsson, who opened the New York pan-African restaurant Merkato 55. “You are now seeing those [North African and Arab spices] like harissa, za'atar and dukka showing up on menus." And to help the spices make their way into the American kitchen, Samuelsson launched Afrikya, a line of African spices. The North African and Middle Eastern spice combination of poppy seeds and rose was even named one of the Top 10 flavor pairings for 2008 by McCormick & Co.
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Archives for Lifestyle

EMS Workers Fired Over KKK Photos

Three paramedic trainees (identified as Timothy Prahm, Henry Solares and Thomas Hart), who were training at Newark's University Hospital in New Jersey, were fired by the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, after cell phone images of two of them dressed in white robes holding a large wooden cross surfaced. The university's president, William F. Owen Jr., said in a written statement, "[The university] has never and will never tolerate attitudes and behaviors that discriminate against any individual or group." He also added that the incident appeared to be a hazing by EMS: "You can't make this stuff up. It's like being in Tennessee in the 1950s."
Read More

MUST SEE: The Supreme’s Costume Exhibit

More than 50 outfits (in addition to a collection of photos, album covers, and live footage) are on display at London's Victoria and Albert Museum until October. In a much-deserving exhibit, "The Story of the Supremes," tracks the Motown trio as the epitome of glamour that set a groundbreaking standard for future girl group molds. Not only did they set an example for En Vogue and Destiny's Child, but The Supremes changed the world's perception of African-Americans, proving that black is beautiful! "When I saw the Supremes on TV...it was magical to me because I had never seen black women on television or anywhere for that matter who conveyed such glamour and such grace," Oprah Winfrey said of seeing The Supremes for the first time on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964. O.G. Supreme Mary Wilson said before the opening last May, "I have kept these dresses in storage for over 30 years, it was my dream that one day I could share them with the world.''
Read More

Benihana Founder Hiroaki Aoki Dies

Tokyo-born restauranteur Hiroaki 'Rocky' Aoki died on Thursday in New York City at the age of 69. The father of model Devon Aoki and DJ Steve Aoki succumbed to pneumonia due to complication from cancer, but had also suffered from diabetes, cirrhosis of the liver and hepatitis C--which he contracted from a blood transfusion. A former wrestler on the Japanese Olympic team, Aoki moved to New York after failing to qualify for the 1960 games in Rome. He went on to open his first teppanyaki-styled restaurant in 1964, with $10,000 he earned selling ice cream from a truck. Aoki had resigned from the company in 1998 after pleading guilty to an inside trade and had been acting as a consultant to the chain, which included over 85 restaurants worldwide. A self-proclaimed "risk-taker" Aoki drove in the 1970s Cannonball Run, an underground cross-country race, competed in offshore powerboat racing, and became the first person to cross the Pacific Ocean in a hot-air balloon in the early 1980s, setting a world record.
Read More

Medicine’s Racial Divide

The American Medical Association apologized to black doctors, admitting to a history of racial discrimination in its policies and practices. Dr. Ronald Davis, the AMA’s previous president, says the group has "a feeling of profound regret and embarrassment for what has been uncovered." Dr. Nelson Adams, who was most recently the president of the National Medical Association, which was founded in 1895 to represent black doctors, says, "[The] AMA looked the other way when local medical associations worked to exclude most black physicians from becoming members." The AMA apology is prompted by a study commissioned in 2005 titled, “The Racial Divide in Organized Medicine,” which will be published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. It was only on Saturday that a state study showed that in New York City, black nurses were being paid less than their white counterparts.
Read More

Ga Ga: Designer Adama Kargbo Makes Fashion, Not War

Escaping the confines of civil war, Sierra Leone native Adama Kargbo, 24, has spun the wounds from her country and the skills she sharpened at the prestigious Parsons the New School for Design into a couture line. Called Aschobi, Kargbo's high-end line is based in Freetown, the capitol of her war-shattered West African country, according to GOOD Magazine, which says her "clothes give traditional African style an urban twist." On her line's Facebook page, Kargbo describes her mission as seeking to "Africanize the fashion industry, removing the African from exotic to everyday while at the same time continuing the legacy of African Couture as was begun in Dakar and Bamako in the 1950s." PHOTO: Henry Jacobson
Read More

Chanel Iman Still Passed Over in Fashion

Even after fashion bible Vogue asked, "Is fashion racist?" Chanel Iman is still passed over for modeling jobs, the 17-year-old It Girl—and our favorite model of the moment—tells Newsweek. "I will fly to London for what is supposed to be 20 casting calls and won't get but 15 because the other five designers don't want black models," says Chanel Iman, who is currently in Gap billboards around the country and is arguably the hottest black fashion model (next to Liya Kebede). "That's not going to happen to white models. It's upsetting and insulting and totally backwards.'' Supermodel Naomi Campbell also chimes in, "This is not the conversation I thought I would have to have at this point. You think you've broken the barriers and then the game changes. So you have to fight all over again."
Read More

Outarra And Samuelsson Bring the Spice

Ivory Coast native Morou Outtara and Ethiopian-born Marcuss Samuelsson are the latest culinary artists infusing the American palate with bold flavors from Africa. Outtara peppers the food at his Virginia restaurant, Farrah Olivia, with flavors from his West African homeland and thinks America is ready for the new tastes. "For six, seven years now people are playing with the idea of African food, and people are now starting to accept it," Outtara said in an interview with Philly.com. "It's been gradually happening," said Samuelsson, who opened the New York pan-African restaurant Merkato 55. “You are now seeing those [North African and Arab spices] like harissa, za'atar and dukka showing up on menus." And to help the spices make their way into the American kitchen, Samuelsson launched Afrikya, a line of African spices. The North African and Middle Eastern spice combination of poppy seeds and rose was even named one of the Top 10 flavor pairings for 2008 by McCormick & Co.
Read More