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Rosario Dawson Gets Web Savvy with Gemini Division

Our favorite former Kid, Rosario Dawson, is starring in the new online sci-fi series, Gemini Division--the "first Web series to feature a bona fide Hollywood star," according to Wired magazine. In the groundbreaking series, which has been picked up by NBC, Dawson plays Anna Diaz, a New York City detective dealing with an international sci-fi conspiracy as part of a special task force called Gemini Division. "She looks like she can kick some ass," says screenwriter Brent Friedman, who is producing the web serial (which is shot in a confessional narrative style, a la Lonelygirl15) with director Stan Rogow and Jeff Sagansky, as part of their production company, Electric Farm Entertainment "The thing that's succeeded on the Web — besides, obviously, porn — is people themselves," the 29-year-old Dawson, who co-created the comic Occult Crimes Taskforce, tells the magazine. "They're putting up their own stuff — really off the cuff, no money involved. So we're taking a huge risk. But it's exciting to be part of something new. Even if we mess it up, we were the first, you know? That's kind of awesome in itself." Dawson's foray into online media premieres August 18 on NBC.com.
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ObamaNation: Tavis Smiley No-Likey Barack Obama

TV talk show and radio host Tavis Smiley seems to be a bit frazzled by Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama. "There is no such thing in America as race transcendence, and Obama's going to find that out real soon," Smiley tells the AP. "There's no such thing as 'post-racial' in America, because if you push the envelope too far, you're going to hear about it." Smiley's negative outlook on Obama seems to stem from Obama's decision not to appear on Smiley's annual State of the Black Union cablecast on C-SPAN last February, which prompted Smiley to criticize Obama on-air. Smiley's remarks sent black bloggers into a frenzy, with Smiley at the center of their apparent rage. "Just because Barack Obama is black, doesn't mean he gets a pass on being held accountable on issues that matter to black people," Smiley says. "This is what I do—asking critical questions. Now some of you regard it as keeping a brother down, holding a brother back. Because you regard it that way, you don't understand that this is the role that I've always played."
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Ga Ga: JCPenney Remakes The Breakfast Club

Because we love The Breakfast Club and we love Simple Minds' "Don't You (Forget About Me)," we are just ga ga for JCPenney's new back-to-school commercial--we know it's low-rent, but hey, we can't help that a department store's commercial puts a smile on our face! Saatchi & Saatchi recreated all of the best scenes from John Hughes classic '80s film: Emilio Estevez' sweatshirt tug; Ally Sheedy pouring a sugar straw on a sandwich; the post smoke-up dance-a-thon, including Molly Ringwald's Carltonesque dance on the library landing; everyone running and sliding down the halls. Totally awesome! And the best part--it's diverse! There were actual real live black people recreating The Breakfast Club--a black girl even takes over Ringwald's popular girl role. Granted, it's a rip-off of one of the all-time greatest teen angst films ever, and yeah, they could've at least sprung for the original recording of the song, but we're willing to overlook all that. Someone finally loaded the commercial on YouTube so we can watch it over and over again!
Read More

The View: Whoopi Explains Racism, Hasselbeck Cries

Footage revealing that Jesse Jackson used the N-word (in addition to saying he wanted to cut Barack Obama's "nuts off") sparked a heated discussion between The View's Whoopi Goldberg and Elisabeth Hasselbeck. Hasselbeck, a staunch Republican, held back tears as she grappled with the double standard that black people are using the N-word, while she's trying to teach her children otherwise. The mother of two explains, "When we live in a world where pop culture then uses that term and we're trying to get to a place where we feel like we're in the same place and we feel like we're in the same world how are we supposed to then move forward if we keep using terms that bring back that pain?" Goldberg quickly cuts Hasselbeck off and clears up the misconception that we are all "living in the same world," arguing that her own mother's lack of voting rights in America is evidence of the different worlds. "You must acknowledge the understanding of what it [the N-Word] is and why it is, in order to go [forward]," Goldberg insists. All double standards are hard to understand, and it is practically impossible to selectively delegate which racial groups are empowered to use the word and in what context (ie: Are bi-racial people, who appear to be white, allowed to use the word?). But Goldberg just might have good cause to defend the usage of the word and stress the understanding of the hows and whys before extracting it completely. It wasn't too long ago that blacks had to accept the double standard that was segregation and slavery under the Constitution, so it shouldn't be too hard for Hasselbeck to understand the double standard of one ridiculous little word.
Read More

Project Runway Season 5 Delights Blindie With Diversity

Project Runway Season Five premiered Wednesday night, and we couldn’t be happier: there are three African-American designers this year, and two of them are women! Here's the lineup: Terri Stevens, 39, from Chicago; Korto Momolu, 33, from Little Rock via Liberia; and Jerell Scott, 28, originally from Houston. To top it off, the Bravo competition finally included an Asian male--Jerry, 32, from Montana (previous seasons featured Asian females). Blindie predicts...

  • Jerell will be a treasure trove of one-liners and sass ("All you other designers can go home one by one")
  • Terri will give us indie chic, as she has already described her style as "Aerosmith meets Lauryn Hill meets Michael Jackson"
  • Korto will be all business and full of design surprises, as she aspires to be the first African American winner (an honor stolen from Season One's Kara Saun!)
As the elimination process crept closer, we held our breath as Korto and Jerry landed in the elimination line-up. And just when we thought this season was going to be a couture melting pot, Jerry was sent packing after creating an American Psycho-esque ensemble from a shower curtain and a table cloth.
Read More

ObamaNation: Comedians Tread Lightly When Delivering Obama Jokes

Many writers and comedians are having a hard time creating punchlines when it comes to Barack Obama, according to two articles in the New York Times. “There’s a weird reverse racism going on,” late-night host Jimmy Kimmel said of the mostly-white staff and comedians, who are having difficulty getting past Obama's pristine veneer--and race. The Times claims that due to the presidential hopeful's ethnicity, lack of "buffoonish"-ness, and audiences' resistance to seeing him skewered, Obama's "been flayed by the sort of ridicule that diminished Dukakis, Gore and Kerry." "If Obama keeps being stingy with his quips and smiles, and if the dominant perception of him is that you can’t make jokes about him, it might infect his campaign with an airless quality," Maureen Dowd says in her column. "His humorlessness could spark humor." Mike Sweeney, the head writer for Late Night with Conan O'Brien is pretty hopeful: “We’re hoping he picks an idiot as vice president.” PHOTO: AP
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Archives for TV

Rosario Dawson Gets Web Savvy with Gemini Division

Our favorite former Kid, Rosario Dawson, is starring in the new online sci-fi series, Gemini Division--the "first Web series to feature a bona fide Hollywood star," according to Wired magazine. In the groundbreaking series, which has been picked up by NBC, Dawson plays Anna Diaz, a New York City detective dealing with an international sci-fi conspiracy as part of a special task force called Gemini Division. "She looks like she can kick some ass," says screenwriter Brent Friedman, who is producing the web serial (which is shot in a confessional narrative style, a la Lonelygirl15) with director Stan Rogow and Jeff Sagansky, as part of their production company, Electric Farm Entertainment "The thing that's succeeded on the Web — besides, obviously, porn — is people themselves," the 29-year-old Dawson, who co-created the comic Occult Crimes Taskforce, tells the magazine. "They're putting up their own stuff — really off the cuff, no money involved. So we're taking a huge risk. But it's exciting to be part of something new. Even if we mess it up, we were the first, you know? That's kind of awesome in itself." Dawson's foray into online media premieres August 18 on NBC.com.
Read More

ObamaNation: Tavis Smiley No-Likey Barack Obama

TV talk show and radio host Tavis Smiley seems to be a bit frazzled by Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama. "There is no such thing in America as race transcendence, and Obama's going to find that out real soon," Smiley tells the AP. "There's no such thing as 'post-racial' in America, because if you push the envelope too far, you're going to hear about it." Smiley's negative outlook on Obama seems to stem from Obama's decision not to appear on Smiley's annual State of the Black Union cablecast on C-SPAN last February, which prompted Smiley to criticize Obama on-air. Smiley's remarks sent black bloggers into a frenzy, with Smiley at the center of their apparent rage. "Just because Barack Obama is black, doesn't mean he gets a pass on being held accountable on issues that matter to black people," Smiley says. "This is what I do—asking critical questions. Now some of you regard it as keeping a brother down, holding a brother back. Because you regard it that way, you don't understand that this is the role that I've always played."
Read More

Ga Ga: JCPenney Remakes The Breakfast Club

Because we love The Breakfast Club and we love Simple Minds' "Don't You (Forget About Me)," we are just ga ga for JCPenney's new back-to-school commercial--we know it's low-rent, but hey, we can't help that a department store's commercial puts a smile on our face! Saatchi & Saatchi recreated all of the best scenes from John Hughes classic '80s film: Emilio Estevez' sweatshirt tug; Ally Sheedy pouring a sugar straw on a sandwich; the post smoke-up dance-a-thon, including Molly Ringwald's Carltonesque dance on the library landing; everyone running and sliding down the halls. Totally awesome! And the best part--it's diverse! There were actual real live black people recreating The Breakfast Club--a black girl even takes over Ringwald's popular girl role. Granted, it's a rip-off of one of the all-time greatest teen angst films ever, and yeah, they could've at least sprung for the original recording of the song, but we're willing to overlook all that. Someone finally loaded the commercial on YouTube so we can watch it over and over again!
Read More

The View: Whoopi Explains Racism, Hasselbeck Cries

Footage revealing that Jesse Jackson used the N-word (in addition to saying he wanted to cut Barack Obama's "nuts off") sparked a heated discussion between The View's Whoopi Goldberg and Elisabeth Hasselbeck. Hasselbeck, a staunch Republican, held back tears as she grappled with the double standard that black people are using the N-word, while she's trying to teach her children otherwise. The mother of two explains, "When we live in a world where pop culture then uses that term and we're trying to get to a place where we feel like we're in the same place and we feel like we're in the same world how are we supposed to then move forward if we keep using terms that bring back that pain?" Goldberg quickly cuts Hasselbeck off and clears up the misconception that we are all "living in the same world," arguing that her own mother's lack of voting rights in America is evidence of the different worlds. "You must acknowledge the understanding of what it [the N-Word] is and why it is, in order to go [forward]," Goldberg insists. All double standards are hard to understand, and it is practically impossible to selectively delegate which racial groups are empowered to use the word and in what context (ie: Are bi-racial people, who appear to be white, allowed to use the word?). But Goldberg just might have good cause to defend the usage of the word and stress the understanding of the hows and whys before extracting it completely. It wasn't too long ago that blacks had to accept the double standard that was segregation and slavery under the Constitution, so it shouldn't be too hard for Hasselbeck to understand the double standard of one ridiculous little word.
Read More

Project Runway Season 5 Delights Blindie With Diversity

Project Runway Season Five premiered Wednesday night, and we couldn’t be happier: there are three African-American designers this year, and two of them are women! Here's the lineup: Terri Stevens, 39, from Chicago; Korto Momolu, 33, from Little Rock via Liberia; and Jerell Scott, 28, originally from Houston. To top it off, the Bravo competition finally included an Asian male--Jerry, 32, from Montana (previous seasons featured Asian females). Blindie predicts...

  • Jerell will be a treasure trove of one-liners and sass ("All you other designers can go home one by one")
  • Terri will give us indie chic, as she has already described her style as "Aerosmith meets Lauryn Hill meets Michael Jackson"
  • Korto will be all business and full of design surprises, as she aspires to be the first African American winner (an honor stolen from Season One's Kara Saun!)
As the elimination process crept closer, we held our breath as Korto and Jerry landed in the elimination line-up. And just when we thought this season was going to be a couture melting pot, Jerry was sent packing after creating an American Psycho-esque ensemble from a shower curtain and a table cloth.
Read More

ObamaNation: Comedians Tread Lightly When Delivering Obama Jokes

Many writers and comedians are having a hard time creating punchlines when it comes to Barack Obama, according to two articles in the New York Times. “There’s a weird reverse racism going on,” late-night host Jimmy Kimmel said of the mostly-white staff and comedians, who are having difficulty getting past Obama's pristine veneer--and race. The Times claims that due to the presidential hopeful's ethnicity, lack of "buffoonish"-ness, and audiences' resistance to seeing him skewered, Obama's "been flayed by the sort of ridicule that diminished Dukakis, Gore and Kerry." "If Obama keeps being stingy with his quips and smiles, and if the dominant perception of him is that you can’t make jokes about him, it might infect his campaign with an airless quality," Maureen Dowd says in her column. "His humorlessness could spark humor." Mike Sweeney, the head writer for Late Night with Conan O'Brien is pretty hopeful: “We’re hoping he picks an idiot as vice president.” PHOTO: AP
Read More