Quantcast

Archives for Movies

Forbes Names Will Smith Hollywood’s Best-Paid Actor

Fresh Prince-turned-King of the Box Office Will Smith leads the pack of Hollywood's best-paid actors, according to Forbes. Taking in an estimated $80 million over the course of the year, Smith, who is frequently called "the hardest-working man in Hollywood," has the star power--and the talent--to bring an audience to the box office, no matter the film's genre (from Pursuit of Happyness to I Am Legend and Hancock). Rounding out the Top 3: Johnny Depp with $72 million this year and Eddie Murphy with $55 million. PHOTO: AP
Read More

Funny Man: Romany Malco Dresses Up For GQ

From his sexual tension-filled chemistry with Mary Louise Parker in Weeds to his funny sidekick roles in The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Baby Mama and (Blindie's personal favorite) Blades of Glory, comedic actor Romany Malco lands in GQ's Comedy Issue. Dubbed "The New Funny," Malco appears--all dressed up, of course--in the men's style magazine, as one of the "8 serious reasons that the future of comedy has never looked better!" Here's some highlights from his QA with GQ:

  • The Funniest Movie Ever: 48 Hours
  • The Funniest TV Show Ever Made: Cops
  • The Funniest Person You Know: My dad! To this day, he resents his younger brother for punching his pet monkey.
PHOTO: Peggy Sirota for GQ
Read More

Ga Ga: JCPenney Remakes The Breakfast Club

Because we love The Breakfast Club and we love Simple Minds' "Don't You (Forget About Me)," we are just ga ga for JCPenney's new back-to-school commercial--we know it's low-rent, but hey, we can't help that a department store's commercial puts a smile on our face! Saatchi & Saatchi recreated all of the best scenes from John Hughes classic '80s film: Emilio Estevez' sweatshirt tug; Ally Sheedy pouring a sugar straw on a sandwich; the post smoke-up dance-a-thon, including Molly Ringwald's Carltonesque dance on the library landing; everyone running and sliding down the halls. Totally awesome! And the best part--it's diverse! There were actual real live black people recreating The Breakfast Club--a black girl even takes over Ringwald's popular girl role. Granted, it's a rip-off of one of the all-time greatest teen angst films ever, and yeah, they could've at least sprung for the original recording of the song, but we're willing to overlook all that. Someone finally loaded the commercial on YouTube so we can watch it over and over again!
Read More

Disney’s Black Princess: Maids, Maddy, Voodoo & New Orleans

Last year, the Walt Disney Co. began production on an animated fairy tale, The Frog Princess, set for 2009, featuring Disney’s first black princess. Fastforward a year later and the original concept has been criticized for its reinforcement of racial prejudice and stereotypes, according to the U.K.'s Telegraph. Originally, the film's heroine was to be a chambermaid named Maddy (ahem, "mammy"?!) working for a spoilt white debutante in 1920s New Orleans. Maddy was supposed to be helped by a voodoo priestess fairy godmother to win the heart of a white prince, after he rescued her from a voodoo magician. As a result of its damaging and demeaning racial tones, the groundbreaking film's title has been changed to The Princess and The Frog, with the princess being renamed Tiana. "It's disappointing," Rodney Hinds, features editor of The Voice newspaper, said. "Some of the stereotyping of people from our community is still rigid in people's minds. We have our own dreams and stories like everyone else, and we want them to be portrayed positively." A spokesman for Disney said: "The story takes place in the charming elegance and grandeur of New Orleans' fabled French Quarter during the Jazz Age... Princess Tiana will be a heroine in the great tradition of Disney's rich animated fairy tale legacy, and all other characters and aspects of the story will be treated with the greatest respect and sensitivity."
Read More

Paula Patton Talks Surveillance and Underwear

Promoting two films coming out in August (Swing Vote with Kevin Costner and Mirrors with Kiefer Sutherland), actress Paula Patton appears in the latest issue of Esquire, where she discusses how "surveillance is real." "I think the age we're living in is starting to get scary," the 32-year-old wife of singer Robin Thicke says. "And think about it: All the technology we have is there to keep us busy...When do they have time to be politically active?" Although the in-demand actress, who has filmed three films in the past year, says she is "not doing bra and underwear" photos ("I have to draw the line"), she appears in just that: bra and underwear.
Read More

Back to Black: Get Your Vintage Cinema Poster Stamps

A new set of U.S. postage stamps honoring vintage black cinema is being released Wednesday, according to the AP. The commemorative stamps include vintage movie posters from Duke Ellington in Black and Tan (1929) to Josephine Baker in Princess Tam-Tam (1935). Ceremonies marking the sale of the stamps will be held at the Newark Museum in New Jersey, which is holding its annual Newark Black Film Festival. PHOTO: United States Postal Service
Read More

Color on the Cover: Eva Mendes’ Hot Interview

The recently-rehabbed actress Eva Mendes appears on the August cover of Interview magazine. Mendes, who is also the newest face for Calvin Klein Underwear, not only looks stunning in her steamy covershot, she also talks about some serious issues in the pop culture magazine. Mendes, who made history with Will Smith in 2005's Hitch, says of racism in Hollywood:

“What makes it frustrating is when a director or a studio head doesn’t see me for the same part that they’ll see, let’s say, Drew Barrymore for. Drew’s a great friend of mine. But it’s like, ‘No, we want more of an American type of girl.’ And it’s like, America has opened up. I’m an American girl, born and raised.”
And being Latina in Hollywood isn't necessarily easy, but she doesn't call it a challenge:
“I would never call it a challenge. I think being a woman in Hollywood is a big enough challenge. It really is, man. I don’t want to be one of those people who complain. But the lack of roles out there–it’s unbelievable. I read a lot of scripts....But there are many times that being Latin has actually helped me, being a Cuban-American has helped me.”

Read More

Categories

Search

Categories

Search

Archives for Movies

Forbes Names Will Smith Hollywood’s Best-Paid Actor

Fresh Prince-turned-King of the Box Office Will Smith leads the pack of Hollywood's best-paid actors, according to Forbes. Taking in an estimated $80 million over the course of the year, Smith, who is frequently called "the hardest-working man in Hollywood," has the star power--and the talent--to bring an audience to the box office, no matter the film's genre (from Pursuit of Happyness to I Am Legend and Hancock). Rounding out the Top 3: Johnny Depp with $72 million this year and Eddie Murphy with $55 million. PHOTO: AP
Read More

Funny Man: Romany Malco Dresses Up For GQ

From his sexual tension-filled chemistry with Mary Louise Parker in Weeds to his funny sidekick roles in The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Baby Mama and (Blindie's personal favorite) Blades of Glory, comedic actor Romany Malco lands in GQ's Comedy Issue. Dubbed "The New Funny," Malco appears--all dressed up, of course--in the men's style magazine, as one of the "8 serious reasons that the future of comedy has never looked better!" Here's some highlights from his QA with GQ:

  • The Funniest Movie Ever: 48 Hours
  • The Funniest TV Show Ever Made: Cops
  • The Funniest Person You Know: My dad! To this day, he resents his younger brother for punching his pet monkey.
PHOTO: Peggy Sirota for GQ
Read More

Ga Ga: JCPenney Remakes The Breakfast Club

Because we love The Breakfast Club and we love Simple Minds' "Don't You (Forget About Me)," we are just ga ga for JCPenney's new back-to-school commercial--we know it's low-rent, but hey, we can't help that a department store's commercial puts a smile on our face! Saatchi & Saatchi recreated all of the best scenes from John Hughes classic '80s film: Emilio Estevez' sweatshirt tug; Ally Sheedy pouring a sugar straw on a sandwich; the post smoke-up dance-a-thon, including Molly Ringwald's Carltonesque dance on the library landing; everyone running and sliding down the halls. Totally awesome! And the best part--it's diverse! There were actual real live black people recreating The Breakfast Club--a black girl even takes over Ringwald's popular girl role. Granted, it's a rip-off of one of the all-time greatest teen angst films ever, and yeah, they could've at least sprung for the original recording of the song, but we're willing to overlook all that. Someone finally loaded the commercial on YouTube so we can watch it over and over again!
Read More

Disney’s Black Princess: Maids, Maddy, Voodoo & New Orleans

Last year, the Walt Disney Co. began production on an animated fairy tale, The Frog Princess, set for 2009, featuring Disney’s first black princess. Fastforward a year later and the original concept has been criticized for its reinforcement of racial prejudice and stereotypes, according to the U.K.'s Telegraph. Originally, the film's heroine was to be a chambermaid named Maddy (ahem, "mammy"?!) working for a spoilt white debutante in 1920s New Orleans. Maddy was supposed to be helped by a voodoo priestess fairy godmother to win the heart of a white prince, after he rescued her from a voodoo magician. As a result of its damaging and demeaning racial tones, the groundbreaking film's title has been changed to The Princess and The Frog, with the princess being renamed Tiana. "It's disappointing," Rodney Hinds, features editor of The Voice newspaper, said. "Some of the stereotyping of people from our community is still rigid in people's minds. We have our own dreams and stories like everyone else, and we want them to be portrayed positively." A spokesman for Disney said: "The story takes place in the charming elegance and grandeur of New Orleans' fabled French Quarter during the Jazz Age... Princess Tiana will be a heroine in the great tradition of Disney's rich animated fairy tale legacy, and all other characters and aspects of the story will be treated with the greatest respect and sensitivity."
Read More

Paula Patton Talks Surveillance and Underwear

Promoting two films coming out in August (Swing Vote with Kevin Costner and Mirrors with Kiefer Sutherland), actress Paula Patton appears in the latest issue of Esquire, where she discusses how "surveillance is real." "I think the age we're living in is starting to get scary," the 32-year-old wife of singer Robin Thicke says. "And think about it: All the technology we have is there to keep us busy...When do they have time to be politically active?" Although the in-demand actress, who has filmed three films in the past year, says she is "not doing bra and underwear" photos ("I have to draw the line"), she appears in just that: bra and underwear.
Read More

Back to Black: Get Your Vintage Cinema Poster Stamps

A new set of U.S. postage stamps honoring vintage black cinema is being released Wednesday, according to the AP. The commemorative stamps include vintage movie posters from Duke Ellington in Black and Tan (1929) to Josephine Baker in Princess Tam-Tam (1935). Ceremonies marking the sale of the stamps will be held at the Newark Museum in New Jersey, which is holding its annual Newark Black Film Festival. PHOTO: United States Postal Service
Read More

Color on the Cover: Eva Mendes’ Hot Interview

The recently-rehabbed actress Eva Mendes appears on the August cover of Interview magazine. Mendes, who is also the newest face for Calvin Klein Underwear, not only looks stunning in her steamy covershot, she also talks about some serious issues in the pop culture magazine. Mendes, who made history with Will Smith in 2005's Hitch, says of racism in Hollywood:

“What makes it frustrating is when a director or a studio head doesn’t see me for the same part that they’ll see, let’s say, Drew Barrymore for. Drew’s a great friend of mine. But it’s like, ‘No, we want more of an American type of girl.’ And it’s like, America has opened up. I’m an American girl, born and raised.”
And being Latina in Hollywood isn't necessarily easy, but she doesn't call it a challenge:
“I would never call it a challenge. I think being a woman in Hollywood is a big enough challenge. It really is, man. I don’t want to be one of those people who complain. But the lack of roles out there–it’s unbelievable. I read a lot of scripts....But there are many times that being Latin has actually helped me, being a Cuban-American has helped me.”

Read More