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ObamaNation: New York Magazine Covers Race in Barack’s Presidential Campaign

Covering “The Impossible Conversation,” New York magazine analyzes the racial climate and politics surrounding the historical Barack Obama presidential campaign.

“Obama, after all, isn’t having trouble with African-American voters or Hispanic voters or young voters. Where he’s lagging is among white voters, and with older ones in particular,” John Heilemann boldly writes. “Call me crazy, but isn’t it possible, just possible, that Obama’s lead is being inhibited by the fact that he is, you know, black?”

In another article, “Black & Blacker,” Vanessa Grigoriadis writes about the racial politics of the Obama marriage. “She’s a type we’ve rarely seen in the public eye, a well-educated woman who is a dedicated mother, successful in her career, and happens to be black,” Grigoriadis observes. “This has created confusion for some people, who seem desperate to find a negative quality in her: She’s too big, too masculine, too much like a drag queen.”

Although Obama isn’t running on the platform of being black (he’s a multi-tiered human being, for chrissake, who grew up in Hawaii and Indonesia and is of Kenyan, African-American, and Caucasian descent), Blindie applauds the magazine for dedicating an entire issue to race.

Blindie particularly loves the article, “ObamaKids,” where the writer John McWhorter says, “If Obama becomes president, there will be a shift in the conception of race in this country that neither side in the culture wars can control. It’s all about youth. Think about it. If Obama is elected to two terms, an entire generation of 10-year-olds will come of age having been barely aware of anyone other than a black man in the White House.”

Categories: Race Matters.

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ObamaNation: New York Magazine Covers Race in Barack’s Presidential Campaign

Categories: Race Matters.

Covering “The Impossible Conversation,” New York magazine analyzes the racial climate and politics surrounding the historical Barack Obama presidential campaign.

“Obama, after all, isn’t having trouble with African-American voters or Hispanic voters or young voters. Where he’s lagging is among white voters, and with older ones in particular,” John Heilemann boldly writes. “Call me crazy, but isn’t it possible, just possible, that Obama’s lead is being inhibited by the fact that he is, you know, black?”

In another article, “Black & Blacker,” Vanessa Grigoriadis writes about the racial politics of the Obama marriage. “She’s a type we’ve rarely seen in the public eye, a well-educated woman who is a dedicated mother, successful in her career, and happens to be black,” Grigoriadis observes. “This has created confusion for some people, who seem desperate to find a negative quality in her: She’s too big, too masculine, too much like a drag queen.”

Although Obama isn’t running on the platform of being black (he’s a multi-tiered human being, for chrissake, who grew up in Hawaii and Indonesia and is of Kenyan, African-American, and Caucasian descent), Blindie applauds the magazine for dedicating an entire issue to race.

Blindie particularly loves the article, “ObamaKids,” where the writer John McWhorter says, “If Obama becomes president, there will be a shift in the conception of race in this country that neither side in the culture wars can control. It’s all about youth. Think about it. If Obama is elected to two terms, an entire generation of 10-year-olds will come of age having been barely aware of anyone other than a black man in the White House.”

Categories: Race Matters.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

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