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Olympic Swimmer Cullen Jones Makes A Splash

Twenty-four year old Cullen Jones is the third African American to make an U.S. Olympic swimming squad and he is determined to dispel the myths that black people can’t swim or are biologically less buoyant than white people (as laughably outlined in a 1969 study called “The Negro and Learning to Swim“).

While it is common for most West Indians and coastal Africans to be adept at swimming there are three major historical factors in America that have kept blacks out of the water: slave owners preventing them from learning to swim so they wouldn’t run away; segregation that prevented blacks from using public pools; and economic disadvantage.

After a 2007 study commissioned by USA Swimming and the University of Memphis found that 60 percent of African-American children couldn’t swim, Cullen Jones partnered with the USA Swimming Foundation’s “Make a Splash Program.”

In addition to teaching kids to swim, Cullen Jones acts as an example for black youth as he strives to be the second African American Olympic swimmer to win a gold medal (Anthony Ervin became the first when he won the 50 meter freestyle in a tie with Gary Hall Jr. in 2000).

Jones will compete at the Beijing Olympic Games in August.

PHOTO: Daniel Johnson

Categories: Race Matters and Sports.

Comments

  1. First of all .. thank you for posting this video … scince im going to study medicine in zhengzhou university what type of advice you can give me about china and and the language coz we gonna take a compulsory coarses .

  2. I wish more people would write blogs like this that are actually interesting to read. With all the crap floating around on the web, it is refreshing to read a blog like yours instead.

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Olympic Swimmer Cullen Jones Makes A Splash

Categories: Race Matters and Sports.

Twenty-four year old Cullen Jones is the third African American to make an U.S. Olympic swimming squad and he is determined to dispel the myths that black people can’t swim or are biologically less buoyant than white people (as laughably outlined in a 1969 study called “The Negro and Learning to Swim“).

While it is common for most West Indians and coastal Africans to be adept at swimming there are three major historical factors in America that have kept blacks out of the water: slave owners preventing them from learning to swim so they wouldn’t run away; segregation that prevented blacks from using public pools; and economic disadvantage.

After a 2007 study commissioned by USA Swimming and the University of Memphis found that 60 percent of African-American children couldn’t swim, Cullen Jones partnered with the USA Swimming Foundation’s “Make a Splash Program.”

In addition to teaching kids to swim, Cullen Jones acts as an example for black youth as he strives to be the second African American Olympic swimmer to win a gold medal (Anthony Ervin became the first when he won the 50 meter freestyle in a tie with Gary Hall Jr. in 2000).

Jones will compete at the Beijing Olympic Games in August.

PHOTO: Daniel Johnson

Categories: Race Matters and Sports.

Comments

  1. First of all .. thank you for posting this video … scince im going to study medicine in zhengzhou university what type of advice you can give me about china and and the language coz we gonna take a compulsory coarses .

  2. I wish more people would write blogs like this that are actually interesting to read. With all the crap floating around on the web, it is refreshing to read a blog like yours instead.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

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